2000 Level Courses

HUMA 2310 6.0 THE CARRIBEAN AND CANADA: CULTURE, IDENTITY

An introduction to the major cultural characteristics of the Caribbean through study of the scholars, writers, and artists of the region. Themes include colonialism, slavery and indenture ship; the quest for national independence; the role of race, ethnicity and gender in the negotiation of individual and collective identities; the tension between elite and popular culture; and the Caribbean Diaspora in North America. Course materials include scholarly and literary works, films and music. Previously offered as: AP/HUMA 2310 9.00.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religious Thoughts and Practices

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Christianity

COURSE DIRECTORS: David Trotman and Maxine Wood

David Trotman

CLASS TIME AND LOCATION: Wed 12:30–2:30 pm (plus tutorial), CLH 110

COURSE WEBSITE:

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces reserved for Humanities & Latin American and Caribbean Studies & International Development Studies Majors and Minors.

HUMA 2805 6.0 WORLD RELIGIONS IN CANADA

Tracing the origins and development of different religious communities, this course identifies and analyzes ways in which the religious reflects, shapes and embodies the social and cultural diversity and plurality of everyday life in Canada. It invites students to explore a variety of religious experiences and traditions, as they are domesticated in local and familiar contexts upon Canada's social and cultural landscape. The course examines the sacred texts, myths, doctrines, ethics, rituals, institutions and attitudes to contemporary issues of First Nations peoples, Jews, Christians, Muslims, Ba’hais, Hindus, Buddhists, Sikhs and East Asians in their personal spiritual and communal religious lives. The course compares and contrasts classical and Canadian forms of the religious traditions studied, both in terms of their historical dispersion and in terms of their dealings one with another in today's Canada in both urban and rural environments. New Religious Movements and less well-known expressions of the spiritual and the religious also receive attention. Students are encouraged to investigate the contemporary status and future development of the spiritual and the religious in Canada, especially instances of their individual and institutional manifestation in material culture and the popular media.

COURSE CATEGORY: Self, Society, and the Other

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED:  Buddhism, East Asian Religions, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Sikhism

COURSE DIRECTOR (CLICK ON IMAGE FOR FACULTY PROFILE):

Jamie Scott

CLASS TIME AND LOCATION: Tues 2:30–5:30 pm, ACW 302

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces reserved for Humanities and Religious Studies Majors and Minors.