2000 Level Courses

ARB 2000 6.0 INTERMEDIATE MODERN STANDARD ARABIC

The course begins with a review of grammar covered at the introductory level and continues to focus on the acquisition of more complex grammatical structures, expanding vocabulary, and discourse skills. By the end of the course, students will be able to read and translate longer passages of Arabic.

PREREQUISITE: AP/ARB1000 6.0, or equivalent knowledge of Introductory Arabic, and a placement interview with the instructor; (contact Dept. for interview date).

ARB 2000 6.0 INTERMEDIATE MODERN STANDARD ARABIC

The course begins with a review of grammar covered at the introductory level and continues to focus on the acquisition of more complex grammatical structures, expanding vocabulary, and discourse skills. By the end of the course, students will be able to read and translate longer passages of Arabic.

PREREQUISITE: AP/ARB1000 6.0, or equivalent knowledge of Introductory Arabic, and a placement interview with the instructor; (contact Dept. for interview date).

ARB 2700 6.0A INTRODUCTION ARAB CULTURE (Cross-listed to AP/HUMA 2710 6.0)

This course introduces the diversity of Arab cultures: their values, practices, and cultural products, such as literature, music, Internet and cinema, from the 19th century to present day. No knowledge of Arabic is required.

Course credit exclusions: AP/HUMA 2710 6.00.

ARTH 2340 3.0A ARTS OF ASIA

Provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the art and architecture of East Asia explores a wide range of representations from artifacts and artworks to popular media and the built-environment. Discussions focus on issues of identity formation, political ethics, religious authorities, the nation-state, modernity, colonialism, and race/gender relations. Open to non-majors.

Course Credit Exclusion: FA/VISA 2340 6.0.

CH 2000 6.0 INTERMEDIATE MODERN STANDARD CHINESE

This course continues the work of AP/CH 1000 6.00 so that students can hold discussions on contemporary China and can read and write approximately 1100 characters.

Prerequisite: AP/CH 1000 6.00. Course credit exclusion: AP/CH 2030 6.00.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/CH 2000 6.00, AS/CH 2010 6.00 and AS/CH 2030 6.00.

CH 2030 6.0A INTERMEDIATE CHINESE LANGUAGE AND CULTURE IN CHINA

This is an intensive intermediate Chinese language and culture course, taught on the York campus and followed by a stay at Fudan University in Shanghai. The course covers language structures and functions, vocabulary and topics on Chinese culture and civilization.

Course credit exclusion: AP/CH 2000 6.00.

Prerequisite: AP/CH 1000 6.00, or permission of the department.

GK 2000 6.0 INTERMEDIATE CLASSICAL AND BIBLE GREEK

FACULTY: AP

The course concentrates on building knowledge of grammar and vocabulary with the aim of reading passages in original Greek by the end of the year. The first part of the course consists of review of grammar and vocabulary presented in Greek 1000, the second part of the course completes the first-year textbook, and the third part of the course introduces continuous passages of original Greek.

PREREQUISITE: AP/GK 1000 6.0 or AP/GK 1400 6.0 or the equivalent with a grade of C+ or higher.

EVALUATION: Two tests 20% each; four quizzes 10% each; one vocabulary and grammar exercise 10%; class participation 10%

COURSE DIRECTOR: TBA

HEB 2000 6.0A INTERMEDIATE MODERN HEBREW

FACULTY: AP

This course is intended to improve the student's ability to read, write, speak and comprehend Modern Hebrew. Although the course presupposes the equivalent of one year of elementary Hebrew, a systematic review of grammar is included. Emphasis is on vocabulary building and comprehension of Modern Hebrew texts through reading of short stories and discussions. Computer Programs will be used for additional practice and review of vocabulary and grammar taught in class.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: AS/HEB 2010 6.0 or AP/HEB 2010 6.0

PREREQUISITE: AS/HEB 1000 6.0 or AP/HEB 1010 6.0 or the equivalent. Not normally open to students who have completed grade 8 in Hebrew or above, or the equivalent.
Placement questionnaire is required. Departmental Course Entry Authorization slip required PRIOR TO ENROLMENT.

EVALUATION: Written assignments – 20%; quizzes – 15%; first term test – 15%; oral presentation – 10%; class participation – 20%; final examination – 20%.

TEXTS: Chayat S., Israeli S., Kobliner H., Hebrew from Scratch, Part II.

COURSE DIRECTOR: TBA

HIST 2220 6.0 MEDIEVAL & EARLY MODERN EUROPE

This course surveys the economic, political, social and cultural evolution of Europe from the fall of the Roman Empire to the 17th century.

Course credit exclusions: GL/HIST 2600 6.00, GL/HIST 3225 3.00.

Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/HIST 2510 6.00, AS/HIST 2200 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2001-2002), AS/HIST 2210 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2001-2002), AS/HIST 2220 6.00, GL/HIST 2600 6.00, GL/HIST 2625 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2001-2002), GL/HIST 3225 3.00.

HIST 2710 HISTORY OF EAST ASIA

This course explores how distinctive patterns of government, society and culture emerged over four millennia in East Asia - primarily China and Japan - and how this endogenous development prepared those nations to confront and challenge Western supremacy in the modern world. Course credit exclusion: AP/HIST 2710 6.00 (prior to Fall 2011).

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 2710 6.00.

HIST 2790 6.0A ISLAMIC CIVILIZATION, 622-1400

FACULTY: AP

This course will survey the diverse history of Islamic societies from the seventh to the early fifteenth century. The primary focus will be on the central Islamic lands from Egypt to Iran. Topics covered include: The pre-Islamic Middle East; Arabian society; the Prophet Muhammad and the rise of the new religion; the expansion of Islam in Asia, Africa, and Europe; the nature of the different Caliphates; the fragmentation of the Islamic polity; the development of various schools of Islamic theology, mysticism, philosophy, science and the arts; the nature of the political, social, and economic institutions; the impact of the Turks, the Crusades and the Mongols.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIONS: Prior to Fall 2009: AK/HIST 3530 6.0. (Prior to Fall/Winter 2000-2001), AS/HIST 2790 6.0, ASHIST 3790 6.0 (Prior to Fall/Winter 2000-2001).

EVALUATION: Map Quiz 5%, Weekly Quizzes 10%, Essays 30%, Midterm Exam 20%, Final Exam 25%, Class Participation 10%.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Thabit Abdullah

HND 2000 6.0 INTERMEDIATE HINDI-URDU

This course focuses on more complex grammatical structures, expanding vocabulary, and on developing competence in a wide range of communicative situations in Hindi-Urdu. The Hindi (Deva Nagari) script is used, however, students are also introduced to the Urdu (Nastaliq) script.

Prerequisite: AP/HIND 1000 6.00 or permission of the department. Course credit exclusions: None.

HND 2700 6.0A SOUTH ASIAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE

This course introduces students to South Asian literature and culture through prose, poetry, music and film. Texts originally written in Hindi and Urdu are emphasized. All readings in English.

Course credit exclusions: None.

HUMA 2105 9.0A ROMAN LITERATURE & CULTURE

FACULTY: AP

NOTE: Successful completion of this course fulfils General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.

An introduction to Roman literature and culture, circa 200 BC to AD 200. Emphasis is placed on the literature, art and architecture of the Romans and on the impact of Roman culture on those peoples under Roman rule.

EVALUATION: TBA

COURSE DIRECTOR: Sarah Blake

HUMA 2310 6.0A AN INTRODUCTION TO CARIBBEAN STUDIES

An introduction to the major cultural characteristics of the Caribbean through study of the scholars, writers, and artists of the region.Themes include colonialism, slavery and indenture ship; the quest for national independence; the role of race, ethnicity and gender in the negotiation of individual and collective identities; the tension between elite and popular culture; and the Caribbean Diaspora in North America. Course materials include scholarly and literary works, films and music.

Critical skills taught in this course: critical thinking, analysis of texts, effective writing, oral expression, library and internet research.

ASSIGNMENTS: writing (short essays, annotated bibliography and research essay) 40%; mid-term and final exams 40%; oral presentations 10%; tutorial participation 10%. (subject to change)

REPRESENTATIVE READINGS: M. Silvera, The Heart Does Not Bend; S. Mootoo, Cereus Blooms. Students are expected to purchase a kit of duplicated readings with articles, essays, poems and songs by authors such as P. Bellegarde-Smith, L. Bennett, E.K. Brathwaite, A. Césaire, Chalkdust, C. Cooper, E. Danticat, F. Fanon, M. Garvey, S. Hall, G. K. Lewis, W. Look-Lai, B. Marley, V.S. Naipaul, P. Mohammed, N. Morejon, R. Nettleford, J. Rhys, R. Reddock, S. Selvon, M. Trouillot, D. Walcott, and E. Williams. Suggested Summer Reading: E. Lovelace, The Dragon Can’t Dance.

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces reserved for Humanities & Latin American and Caribbean Studies & International Development Studies Majors and Minors.

HUMA 2500 6.0A CULTURES IN CONFLICT

FACULTY: AP

NEED DESCRIPTION

TIME: TBA

COURSE DIRECTOR: TBA

HUMA 2805 6.0A WORLD RELIGIONS IN CANADA

FACULTY: AP

Tracing the origins and development of different religious communities, this course identifies and analyzes ways in which the religious reflects, shapes and embodies the social and cultural diversity and plurality of everyday life in Canada. It invites students to explore a variety of religious experiences and traditions, as they are domesticated in local and familiar contexts upon Canada's social and cultural landscape. The course examines the sacred texts, myths, doctrines, ethics, rituals, institutions and attitudes to contemporary issues of First Nations peoples, Jews, Christians, Muslims, Ba'hais, Hindus, Buddhists, Sikhs and East Asians in their personal spiritual and communal religious lives. The course compares and contrasts classical and Canadian forms of the religious traditions studied, both in terms of their historical dispersion and in terms of their dealings one with another in today's Canada in both urban and rural environments. New Religious Movements and less well-known expressions of the spiritual and the religious also receive attention. Students are encouraged to investigate the contemporary status and future development of the spiritual and the religious in Canada, especially instances of their individual and institutional manifestation in material culture and the popular media.

EVALUATION: 1) Two short essays 30%; 2) Mid-term examination 20%; 3) Tutorial assignments and participation 15%; 4) Final examination 35%.

TEXTS: 1) Jamie S. Scott, Ed. The Religions of Canadians (Toronto: Oxford University Press, 2010). 2) Mary P. Fisher & Lee W. Bailey, Eds. An Anthology of Living Religions, 2nd edition (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2008). 3) Specified excerpts and clips from Canadian literature and popular media, including cinema, television, NFB documentaries, newspapers and periodicals, and the internet.

COURSE DIRECTOR: Jamie Scott

HUMA 2830 9.0A THE FOUNDERS OF CHRISTIANITY

FACULTY: AP

NOTE: Successful completion of this course fulfils General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.

An introduction to the literature and history of the early Christian communities in Palestine, Syria, Asia Minor, Greece and Rome. The varieties of early Christian thought and practice are examined in terms of their religious, cultural and political contexts.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSIO: AS/HUMA 2830 9.0

COURSE DIRECTOR: Philip Harland

JP 2000 6.0 INTERMEDIATE MODERN STANDARD JAPANESE

Further study of common grammatical forms and structures; items covered in AS/JP 1000 6.00 are reviewed and expanded. Situation and task oriented conversation, strategy-centred reading and structure-based writing are involved with emphasis on complex sentence grammar. Approximately 300 additional Kanji (Sino-Japanese characters) are introduced.

Prerequisite: AP/JP 1000 6.00 or equivalent. Course credit exclusions: None.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Prerequisites: AS/JP 1000 6.00 or equivalent. Course credit exclusion: AS/JP 2000 6.0

LA 2000 6.0A INTERMEDIATE LATIN

This is an intensive course in the reading of Latin prose and poetry intended for students who have had Grade 12 U or M Latin (or equivalent).

Prerequisites: AP/LA 1000 6.00 or AP/LA 1400 6.00 or permission from the director of classical studies. Course credit exclusions: None.

PHIL 2020 3.0A DESCARTES, SPINOZA & LEIBNIZ

FACULTY: AP

This course is an introduction to the philosophical thought of the three most important rationalist philosophers of the seventeenth century: Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz. We will examine and discuss their attempted solutions to the following problems of metaphysics and epistemology: innatism, the foundations of knowledge, skepticism, the existence and nature of God, the relation between the human mind and the mind of God, the nature of animal minds, reason and emotion, and the mind body problem.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: Prior to Fall 2009: AS/PHIL 2020 3.0.

COURSE DIRECTOR: TBA

PHIL 2035 3.0A ASIAN PHILOSOPHICAL TRADITIONS

An introduction to the major philosophical traditions of India and China.

Course credit exclusions: None.

PHIL 2040 3.0A INTRODUCTION TO ISLAMIC PHILOSOPHY

An introduction to some of the key figures, seminal texts, and main themes of Islamic philosophy in the classical period. Authors may include: al-Farabi, Ibn Sina (Avicenna), al-Ghazali, and Ibn Rushd (Averroes).

Course credit exclusions: None.

PHIL 2090 3.0M PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION

FACULTY: AP

Does God exist? Can religious belief be explained away? What is the relationship between faith and reason? Through a selection of classic readings, this course provides a survey of some central topics in the philosophy of religion.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: Prior to Fall 2009: AK/AS/PHIL 2090 3.0.

COURSE DIRECTOR: TBA

PHIL 2120 3.0M EXISTENTIALISM

FACULTY: AP

An introduction to some central themes of existentialism such as the individual, being, the absurd, freedom, moral choice. These themes are explored in the work of philosophers such as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Camus, Sartre, de Beauvoir.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: Prior to Fall 2009: AK/PHIL 2120 3.0, AS/PHIL 2120 3.0.

COURSE DIRECTOR: TBA

SOCI 2672 3.0A RELIGION AND SOCIETY (cross listed to GL/HUMA 2672 3.0)

This course analyzes the relationship between religion, culture and social class. It observes how religion, as a social structure, organizes communities around beliefs and rituals. It introduces students to classical sociological theories about religion; looking at empirical cases globally.

Course credit exclusion: GL/SOCI 2010 3.00 (Fall 1991, Fall 1992 and Fall 1993) and GL/SOCI 2525 3.00.

SOSC 2430 3.0A PEOPLES AND CULTURES OF SOUTHEAST ASIA

This course examines the cultures and social systems of mainland Southeast Asia. Beginning with an examination of the ecology and prehistory of the region, topics such as Indianization, tribal social organization, Buddhism, rural life, colonialism and urban life are considered.

Course credit exclusion: AP/SOSC 2430 6.00.