3000 Level Courses

HUMA 3105 6.0 GREEK AND ROMAN RELIGION

This course examines Greek and Roman religious beliefs and practices from an interdisciplinary perspective. Special attention is given to four major approaches to the divine (ritual, myth, art and philosophy) and their integration with other aspects of society and culture.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religious Thoughts and Practices

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Greek and Roman Religions

COURSE DIRECTOR (CLICK ON IMAGE FOR FACULTY PROFILE):

Philip Harland

CLASS TIME AND LOCATION: Thurs 11:30 am–2:30pm, DB 0009

COURSE WEBSITE: http://www.philipharland.com

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces reserved for Humanities and Classical Studies Majors and Minors.

HUMA 3115 6.0 MYTH IN ANCIENT GREECE: TEXTS AND THEORIES

This course examines Greek myths of gods and heroes in their social, religious and historical contexts through close reading of primary texts and visual representations and through analysis of modern comparative, psychoanalytical and structuralist theories.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religion Thoughts and Practices

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Greek and Roman Religions

COURSE DIRECTOR (CLICK ON IMAGE FOR FACULTY PROFILE):

Matthew Clark

CLASS TIME AND LOCATION: Fri 11:30 am–2:30 pm, DB 0015

COURSE WEBSITE:

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces reserved for Humanities and Classical Studies Majors and Minors.

HUMA 3421 (FALL) INTERPRETING THE NEW TESTAMENT , PART 1

A historical and literary study of the traditions of Paul and of the Beloved Disciple ("John") as they developed from the time of their founders through several generations of followers.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religion, Literature, and the Arts

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Christianity

COURSE DIRECTOR (CLICK ON IMAGE FOR FACULTY PROFILE):

Philip Harland

CLASS TIME AND LOCATION: Thurs 4–7 pm, DB 0004

COURSE WEBSITE: http://www.philipharland.com

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces reserved for Humanities & Religious Studies Majors and Minors.

HUMA 3422 (WINTER) INTERPRETING THE NEW TESTAMENT, PART 2

A study of the synoptic gospels (Mark, Matthew, Luke) and other early Christian texts from a historical and literary perspective.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religion, Literature, and the Arts

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Christianity

COURSE DIRECTOR (CLICK ON IMAGE FOR FACULTY PROFILE):

Philip Harland

CLASS TIME AND LOCATION: Thurs 4–7 pm, DB 0013

COURSE WEBSITE: http://www.philipharland.com

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces reserved for Humanities & Religious Studies Majors and Minors.

HUMA 3423 3.0 NEW TESTAMENT APOCRYPHA

The New Testament Apocrypha—or better: non-canonical early Christian literature—has had a great impact on western culture despite attempts by mainstream Christianity to suppress it. Stories and ideas from these texts appear in literature, art, church doctrine, and even modern fiction such as Dan Brown’s The DaVinci Code. This course is designed to introduce students to a wide range of non-canonical Christian texts—from gospels, to acts of individual apostles, letters, and apocalypses. The goals will be to understand each text’s place in the development of Christian thought and to observe their use in modern scholarship. Particular emphasis will be placed on the work of the so-called “new school” in New Testament Studies that claims some of these texts may predate, and therefore may have influenced, the canonical gospels.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religion, Literature, and the Arts

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Christianity

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2019/2020

HUMA 3424 3.0 (FALL) HISTORY OF THE BIBLE

Most people take the existence of the modern English Bible for granted—they assume it sprang fully-formed from the hands of the ancient writers or even directly from God. But the Bible has been three millennia in the making. This course traces the development of the Bible beginning with discussions in the first to third centuries on canon formation, through the myriad translations made from antiquity to today, to modern scholars’ attempts to reconstruct the original form of the biblical texts. We will look also at the form various Bibles have taken—from the original scrolls and codices, to elaborately decorated manuscripts, to modern books—as well as the historical events that precipitated the creation of several key editions, and the impact these editions have made over time. Particular attention will be paid to the techniques of text criticism—i.e., the painstaking efforts to sift through the variety of readings in ancient manuscripts to recover the biblical writers’ original words.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religion, Literature, and the Arts

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Christianity, Judaism

COURSE DIRECTOR (CLICK ON IMAGE FOR FACULTY PROFILE):

Tony Burke

COURSE TRAILER:

CLASS TIME AND LOCATION: Wed 7–10 pm, DB 0009

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces reserved for Humanities & Religious Studies Majors and Minors.

HUMA 3425 3.0 DEAD SEA SCROLLS

The Dead Sea Scrolls provide an intriguing window into the development of early Christianity and rabbinic Judaism. This course examines the texts, the communities which produced them, contemporary movements within Judaism and Christianity, and the major lines of interpretive controversy.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religion, Literature, and the Arts; Self, Society, and Other

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Judaism

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2019/2020

HUMA 3435 3.0 AUGUSTINE

A study of the life and seminal ideas of Augustine of Hippo. Setting his ideas in the context of his life story, the course explores his teaching on such themes as religion, education, philosophy, grade and free will, sexuality and politics.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religion, Literature, and the Arts

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Christianity

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: AP/HUMA 3435 6.00.

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2019/2020

HUMA 3439 HOW THE IRISH SAVED WESTERN CIVILIZATION

Examines the remarkable cultural achievements of the Irish, how they kept the lamps of learning, literature and material culture (manuscript, painting, ornamental metalwork) burning following the barbarian invasions of the fifth century and the decline of Roman civilization on the continent.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religious Thoughts and Practices

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Christianity

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2019/2020

HUMA 3440 6.0 ISSUES AND THEMES IN MEDIEVAL CULTURE

A study of the intellectual, spiritual and artistic life of the Middle Ages. Areas of study include courtliness and chivalry, warfare, education, forms of spirituality, authority and dissent, the relation of faith and reason.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religious Thoughts and Practices

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Christianity, Judaism

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2019/2020

HUMA 3457 3.0 (WINTER) GNOSTICISM

An introduction to Gnosticism, a second century religious movement that intersected and overlapped with Christianity and Judaism. Emphasis will be on readings of primary sources. The course objective are to acquaint students with the theories behind the origins and nature of Gnosticism, examine gnostic literature from ancient Christian, Jewish, and “pagan” sources, note the continuation of gnostic thought in later gnostic movements of the Medieval period and the Middle Ages, and consider elements of gnostic thought that exist today. Gnosticism has been characterized as “utterly incomprehensible”; it is my hope that, together, students and instructor can find some order in the chaos of gnostic literature and feel some empathy for the gnostic view of the world and humanity’s place within it. Students will learn advanced text-critical skills and become acquainted with scholarship in the field.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religious Thoughts and Practices

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Christianity

COURSE DIRECTOR (CLICK ON IMAGE FOR FACULTY PROFILE):

Tony Burke

COURSE TRAILER:

CLASS TIME AND LOCATION: Wed 7–10 pm, DB 0009

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces reserved for Humanities & Religious Studies Majors and Minors.

HUMA 3480 6.0 CONTEMPORARY RELIGIOUS ISSUES

This course critically examines selected contemporary religious issues such as the challenge of feminism, nature of biblical authority, rise of fundamentalism, 20th-century discoveries of other ancient texts, clash of world religions, nature religions and liberation theology.

COURSE CATEGORY: Methods and Approaches

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Varies by year

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2019/2020

HUMA 3481 6.0 STUDIES IN WORLD RELIGIONS

Examines selected religions such as Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Christianity and Judaism with special reference to selected texts, traditions and thought.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religious Thoughts and Practices; Self, Society, and Other

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Buddhism, East Asian Religions, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Christianity

COURSE DIRECTOR:

Tony Michael

CLASS TIME AND LOCATION: Tues 8:30–11:30 am, DB 0011

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces reserved for Humanities & Religious Studies Majors and Minors.

HUMA 3510 6.0 RELIGION, GENDER & KOREAN CULTURE

This course explores the interactions of religion and gender from the traditional to the modern period in Korea, and relates this material to the general process of cultural development.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religion and Gender

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Buddhism, East Asian Religions

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2019/2020

HUMA 3518 6.0 FEMINIST APPROACHES TO RELIGION

This course provides an historical and comparative analysis of the relations between feminism and religion. It explores how religion has strengthened the feminist critique of the oppression of women and other marginalized groups, and how feminists have questioned theological conceptions of the social and spiritual place of women and other marginalized groups.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religion and Gender; Methods and Approaches

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Varies by year

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2019/2020

HUMA 3519 6.0 CONTEMPORARY WOMEN'S RITUALS: AN INTRODUCTION

Women have been creating their own significant rituals both inside and outside established religious movements for centuries. Understanding the nature of women's rituals allows us to comprehend more fully women's relationship to humanity and to the numinous. This course will explore the phenomenon of women ritualizing and analyze a variety of contemporary women's rituals in light of classical and feminist ritual theory and methodologies. We will be analyzing rituals sanctioned by both monotheistic and polytheistic traditions as well as contemporary women's re-visioning and recreating of liturgy and ritual. Our approach will be interdisciplinary. We will introduce, develop, and expand upon several themes in ritual theory and women's liturgical communities.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religion and Gender; Religious Thoughts and Practices; Methods and Approaches

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Varies by year

COURSE DIRECTOR:

Sherry Rowley

COURSE TRAILER:

CLASS TIME AND LOCATION: Tues 11:30 am–2:30 pm, DB 0009

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces reserved for Humanities & Religious Studies Majors and Minors.

HUMA 3795 3.0 A CULTURAL HISTORY OF SATAN

This course investigates the origins, development, significance, and social functions of personified evil--Satan and his demons--in early Judaism and in the history of Christianity. We will consider some of the most important literary and visual depictions of this figure (and his story) from the ancient world through the middle ages to our own day.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religious Thoughts and Practices; Methods and Approaches

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Christianity, Judaism

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2019/2020

HUMA 3801 6.0 THINKING RELIGION IN SOUTH ASIA

This course explores the teachings of selected religious traditions of South Asian and examines the category of religion as it is applied to South Asia in the context of oriental discourses.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religious Thoughts and Practices; Methods and Approaches

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Hinduism

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2019/2020

HUMA 3802 3.0 SIKH HISTORY AND THOUGHT

This course introduces Sikhism by exploring its main historical developments and religio-philosophical teachings. To understand these historical and religious discourses within their broader social settings a number of themes and contexts are explored: scripture, interpretation, gender, colonialism and the Diaspora.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religious Thoughts and Practices

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Sikhism

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2019/2020

HUMA 3803 3.0 (WINTER) METHODS IN THE STUDY OF RELIGION

Explores the key approaches to the study of religion through an examination of various methodologies. Working through well-known case studies, students investigate a variety of approaches in practice to explore how questions of method shape our broader understanding of religious traditions. This course explores key disciplinary approaches in the study of religion to understand how the choice of method shapes one’s understanding of beliefs, rituals, everyday practices and religious meaning in general. We begin by asking questions about the value and significance of the term “religion,” which is neither self-evident nor easily defined. The course examines different disciplinary perspectives that inform the ways in which religion is approached, understood and conceptualized, while providing an opportunity for students to appreciate the complex role religion plays in today’s world at many levels of social, cultural and political action. Finally, the course offers an overview of the field of “Religious Studies” in terms of its historical and methodological scope, and examines its implications and challenges in light of many current issues such as secularism, spirituality, fundamentalism, globalization, minority and gender rights, and others.

COURSE CATEGORY: Methods and Approaches

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Varies by year

COURSE DIRECTOR (CLICK ON IMAGE FOR FACULTY PROFILE):

Amila Buturovic

CLASS TIME AND LOCATION: Mon 4–7 pm, DB 0013

COURSE WEBSITE:

RESERVED SPACES: All spaces reserved for Religious Studies Majors and Minors only.

HUMA 3804 3.0 (FALL) THEORIES IN THE STUDY OF RELIGION

Introduces students to the foundational theorists and key questions in the history of the academic study of religion. This course examines the lenses through which we view religion, that is, how differing theoretical models shape our understanding of religion as a human phenomenon. Starting with Marx, Durkheim and Weber, the course explores a variety of theoretical models and contemporary debates.

COURSE CATEGORY: Methods and Approaches

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Varies by year

COURSE DIRECTOR (CLICK ON IMAGE FOR FACULTY PROFILE):

Alicia Turner

CLASS TIME AND LOCATION: Wed 2:30–5:30 pm, DB 0013

RESERVED SPACES: All spaces reserved for Religious Studies Majors and Minors only.

HUMA 3810 6.0 HEBREW BIBLE

The Hebrew Bible/Old Testament is one of the foundational texts of western culture. As such, it has had a history of interpretation and reinterpretation that has lasted for some 2000 years. During this period of time certain – oftentimes mutually contradictory – assumptions about what the text means have become entrenched among the various groups that look to this text as holy scripture and inspirational literature. Indeed, even among those who reject the supposed theological underpinnings of this text, rigid assumptions about what it means or says are common. The major aim of this course is to strip away the layers of interpretation that have been imposed on the text over the millennia, in order to enable the students to approach the text using critical and methodological tools that allow modern readers (1) to attempt to read the Hebrew Bible within the context of its own time and world, and (2) to be aware of the subject nature of their preconceptions. Openness to new ways of understanding and a critical mindset are the only prerequisites necessary.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religion, Literature, and the Arts; Methods and Approaches; Self, Society, and Other

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Judaism

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2019/2020

HUMA 3814 6.0 GENDERING ISLAM: DISCOURSES ON THE MUSLIM MALE AND FEMALE

This course examines the representation and the construction of the gendered roles of “Muslim Woman” and “Muslim Man” in different Islamic societies. Interdisciplinary in approach, the course exposes the students to a variety of Muslim and non-Muslim sources, including works of historiography, jurisprudence and literature which provide a fertile ground for the analysis of the construction of the roles of Male and Female in different Muslim societies. During a critical examination of the source material, the students are asked to discuss the notion of alterity and its relevance for the development of the current myths about “Muslim woman and “Muslim man.” Moreover, students become familiar with the ideas of “male epistemology” and its relevance for the interpretation of the position of the Muslim woman and Muslim men in Islamic legal discourses.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religion and Gender

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Islam

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2019/2020

HUMA 3815 6.0 ASPECTS OF ISLAMIC THOUGHT

This course introduces students to some of the major aspects of classical Islamic thought focusing on their development, diversity, and influences. The course explores the writings of leading figures in Islamic theology, jurisprudence, mysticism and philosophy in the pre-modern period. The course uses Abdullah Saeed's Islamic Thought. An Introduction as a general textbook along with additional articles that will be posted on the moodle site. Students will have weekly readings and discussions that will be part of the general assessment. The course assignments include two exams, an essay, and a review.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religious Thoughts and Practices

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Islam

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2019/2020

HUMA 3816 3.0 THE BALKANS

This course explores the intersections between religion, culture and identity in the Balkans. It offers an interdisciplinary examination of this complex religious and ethnic mosaic through a wide range of sources, including consideration of the image of the Balkans in Europe and beyond.

COURSE CATEGORY: Methods and Approaches

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Islam

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2019/2020

HUMA 3817 6.0 MEMORY, AUTHORITY AND KNOWLEDGE IN THE MUSLIM WORLD

This course focuses on the modes of transmission, acquisition and reproduction of knowledge in a variety of Islamic societies from the ninth century to the present.

COURSE CATEGORY: Methods and Approaches

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Islam

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2019/2020

HUMA 3818 3.0 SACRED SPACE & RITUAL PRACTICES IN ISLAM

The course examines the plurality of rituals and devotional practices in Islam and the variety of spaces and places engendered by Muslim worship and devotion from early Islam to the contemporary period. It examines the diversity of forms of Muslim worship and devotional practices such as prayer, pilgrimage, tomb visitations, as well as individual contemplation and remembrance practices. It examines places such as mosques, sufi lodges, tombs, mausoleums, homes and landscapes. Course readings will be posted on the moodle site. Students will have weekly readings and discussions that will be part of the general assessment. The course assignments include an exam, an essay, and a review.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religious Thoughts and Practices; Methods and Approaches

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Islam

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2019/2020

HUMA 3819 3.0 OUTSIDERS INSIDE RELIGION

Religion plays an important role in inculcating and perpetuating societal norms and values. However, that is only part of the story. Many members of marginalized groups have also found within religion a space in which to resist and to manoeuvre within those same norms and values. For religion is not just the site of patriarchal domination; at the same time that its symbols, rituals, practices, and beliefs serve to shape the worldview of those participating in them, those participants are also re-interpreting and re-configuring those symbols, rituals, practices and beliefs. Members of marginalized groups have always taken advantage of that dynamic, revising, transforming, and challenging the religious rituals, practices, symbols and beliefs inculcating and perpetuating patriarchal norms and values. This course examines the strategies employed by members of marginalized groups over the past several decades to resist and to manoeuvre within patriarchal stereotypes, norms and values from within their religious traditions. The strategies explored will include those employed by feminists, racialized groups, members of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered and queer communities (LGBTQ), members of post-colonial nations, and persons with disabilities.

COURSE CATEGORY: Methods and Approaches

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Varies by year

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: AP/GL/WMST 3518 6.0. Prior to Fall 2009: AS/AK/GL/WMST 3518 6.0, AS/HUMA 3819 3.0.

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2019/2020

HUMA 3825 6.0 THE HOLOCAUST IN CROSS-CULTURAL CONTEXT: CANADA, GERMANY, POLAND

This course examines how the Holocaust is represented and taught in Canada, Germany and Poland in the context of racism and multiculturalism in these three countries. It combines aspects of cultural studies, history, religious studies and literary studies. Note: This course is open only to those students enrolled in the Concurrent Education Program. Note: This course involves participation in a three-week field study program in Germany and Poland from late July until mid-August. As well, this course involves participation in a symposium in February. Admission to the course is by permission of the instructors.

COURSE CATEGORY: Self, Society, and Other

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Judaism

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2019/2020

HUMA 3826 3.0 (WINTER) RELIGION AND FILM

This course examines the role and representation of the religious in popular film. It introduces students to the vocabularies of Religious Studies and Film Studies, and critically explores the relationship between religion and film as aspects of contemporary culture. Drawing mainly on mass-distributed films from Europe and North America, the course analyzes the ways in which contemporary cinema narrativizes Aboriginal, Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist and other religious myths, histories, rituals, institutions, ethics, and doctrines. Issues addressed include: To what extent do particular films reflect the personal beliefs of particular film directors? How are religious leaders, institutions and histories portrayed in contemporary cinema, and to what purpose? How do popular films embody religious symbols, rituals and values, and to what end? How does contemporary cinema represent the teachings and traditions of different religions, in both personal and societal terms? How does the cinema help shape our attitudes towards religious “others”? Topics for discussion include: the creator and the created; free will and destiny; sin and salvation; evil and responsibility; selfhood and society; reality and illusion; transcendence and the afterlife. Some prior knowledge of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist and Maori traditions will be helpful.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religion, Literature, and the Arts

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Varies by year

COURSE DIRECTOR (CLICK ON IMAGE FOR FACULTY PROFILE):

Jamie Scott

CLASS TIME AND LOCATION: Wed 2:30–5:30 pm, FC 202

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces reserved for Humanities & Religious Studies Majors and Minors.

HUMA 3827 3.0 RELIGION AND TELEVISION

This course examines the role and representation of the religious on television. It introduces students to the vocabularies of Religious Studies and Media Studies, and critically explores the relationship between religion and television as aspects of contemporary popular culture. Distinguishing various televison genres from kinds of cinema, the course analyzes the ways in which daily network and specialty channel programming, as well as video-recordings from Europe and North America, represent Aboriginal, Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist and other religious myths, histories, rituals and doctrines. Genres studied include: televangelism; network news; the documentary and docu-drama; the game show; the sit-com; the mini-series; advertizing; music videos etc. Issues addressed include: To what extent do particular programmes reflect the personal beliefs of programme producers or the religious ideologies of particular networks and specialty channels? How are religious leaders, institutions and histories depicted on television? How do different kinds of television programming embody religious images, teachings and traditions, and to what purpose? How do different kinds of television programming represent our values and world-views, as individuals and as a society? How does television help shape our attitudes towards religious “others”? Topics include: the creator, the creation and creatureliness; free will, fate and fortune; sin, forgiveness and salvation; body, selfhood and identity; evil, “othering” and society; transcendence, truth, illusion and reality.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religion, Literature, and the Arts

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Varies by year

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2019/2020

HUMA 3829 3.0 A CONVENIENT HATRED: ANTISEMITISM BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER THE HOLOCAUST

This course examines the evolution of anti-Jewish thought and behaviour as a response to the crisis of modernity. It examines the role of antisemitism in 19th- and 20th-century European ideological, political and socio-economic developments and the Jewish responses to antisemitism.

COURSE CATEGORY: Self, Society, and Other

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Judaism

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2019/2020

HUMA 3831 3.0 (WINTER) TORAH & TRADITION: JEWISH RELIGIOUS EXPRESSIONS FROM ANTIQUITY TO THE PRESENT

This course offers an exploration of Jewish beliefs, institutions, and bodies of literature, emphasizing continuities and changes in religious expression within and across different places, circumstances, and times. Themes covered include God, the Jewish people, Torah and its interpretation, the land of Israel; the commandments (mitzvot) and their legal (halakhic) expressions; the Sabbath; daily and calendrical cycles of holiness; rites of passage, and messianic teachings. Particular attention will be paid to the varieties of Jewish religious denominations in modern times. This course will be offered totally online. Lectures and many of the readings will be posted on the course website. All assignments will be submitted online except for the final examination in the official final examination period of the university.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religious Thoughts and Practices

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Judaism

COURSE DIRECTOR (CLICK ON IMAGE FOR FACULTY PROFILE):

Martin Lockshin

CLASS TIME AND LOCATION: Online

COURSE WEBSITE:

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces reserved for Humanities & Jewish Studies and Religious Studies Majors and Minors.

HUMA 3835 3.0 (FALL) ANTISEMITISM AND ISLAMOPHOBIA IN CANADA

This course examines contemporary manifestations of antisemitism and islamophobia in Canada. It begins by providing a brief historical review of Christian anti-Jewish thought and theology as put forward by the early Church fathers, Augustine and the subsequent papal bulls. The significance of the role of the Jew as moneylender in medieval feudal Europe will be explored as well as the antisemitism of the early modern period found in the writings of Martin Luther at the time of the Protestant Reformation. In addition to tracing these periods of anti-Jewish thought it examines the parallel anti-Muslim sentiment in the medieval Christian world as evidenced by, for example, the Crusades against the “Muslim infidels” in the Holy Land and the Christian project of the “reconquest” of the Iberian Peninsula from the Muslims. Turning to the central theme of Canada, the course explores the social history of Jewish and Muslim immigration and integration into Canada, thus uncovering examples of social exclusion experienced by these immigrant communities. Stereotypical depictions of Jews and Muslims in Canadian discourse will be interrogated to expose the underlying threads of xenophobia. The course will also examine contemporary Canadian internet hate which includes, for example, Holocaust denial and anti-Muslim rhetoric. These areas of investigation allow us reflect on the broader questions of the course which concern the construction of ethnic/religious identity. How do minority groups negotiate their identities to find a comfortable place in a majority society?

COURSE CATEGORY: Self, Society, and Other

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Islam, Judaism

COURSE DIRECTOR:

Randall Schnoor

CLASS TIME AND LOCATION: Wed 11:30 am–2:30 pm, HNE 105

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces for Humanities, Jewish Studies & Religious Studies Majors and Minors.

HUMA 3840 6.0 RABBINIC JUDAISM

This course will present a broad exposure to the history, thought, literature, and main institutions of Rabbinic Judaism from its inception, during the Second Temple period, through contemporary times. We will explore a variety of classical texts and genres in light of their religious and historical settings. We will consider institutions that have shaped Rabbinic Judaism in its varied manifestations throughout the ages down to the present. Finally, we will study various Jewish philosophies with foundations in Rabbinic Judaism from 10thc. Through the Middle Ages to modern thought (21st c).

COURSE CATEGORY: Religious Thoughts and Practices

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Judaism

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2019/2020

HUMA 3841 3.0 MODERN YIDDISH CULTURE

This seminar examines the transformation of Yiddish from the vernacular of an ethno-religious community to a language of modern, secular mass culture and national politics in the 19th and 20th centuries in Eastern Europe.

COURSE CATEGORY: Self, Society, and Other

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Judaism

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2019/2020

HUMA 3845 6.0 DIASPORA, HOME, NOSTALGIA: MODERN JEWISH LITERATURE

What is “Jewish” and what is “modern” about “Modern Jewish Literature”? Examining fiction, poetry, memoirs, and film, the course addresses such issues as post-immigrant experiences; identity; exile and home; gender; anti-Semitism; stereotypes; boundaries and margins.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religion, Literature, and the Arts

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Judaism

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2019/2020

HUMA 3850 6.0 PERSPECTIVES OF THE HOLOCAUST

The attempt of the Nazis to annihilate world Jewry was in many ways unprecedented in human annals. It was a turning-point in history, the way for which was prepared by revolutionary political, social, technological, and philosophical developments. In other ways, however, it was a not unpredictable outgrowth of the past. Although analysis may be difficult and painful, especially for survivors, the Holocaust must be analyzed and understood if those who live on are to learn from it. Such analysis involves the examination of different aspects of life, using the tools of the historian, the theologian, the literary critic, and, to a lesser extent, the social scientist. The course is divided into several sections, each of which approaches a different aspect of the Holocaust: the historical and philosophical background, the psychological and historical reality, and the religious questions that arise in its aftermath.

COURSE CATEGORY: Self, Society, and Other

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Judaism

THIS COURSE IS NOW BEING OFFERED BY THE HISTORY DEPARTMENT

HUMA 3855 6.0 RESPONSES TO THE HOLOCAUST

This course explores responses to the Holocaust in imaginative texts - fiction, poetry and film - alongside autobiographical, historical and philosophical accounts. Works by survivors and others enable us to examine forms of Holocaust memory, and their concomitant implications.

COURSE CATEGORY: Self, Society, and Other

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Judaism

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2019/2020

HUMA 3856 3.0 (FALL) WOMEN AND THE HOLOCAUST

Although the Nazi genocide targeted both men and women, writing by victims and survivors along with contemporary depictions of the Holocaust, indicates significant gender-specific differences in experience and ways of coping and remembering. Close readings and critical analyses of primary texts are emphasized.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religion and Gender

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Judaism

COURSE DIRECTOR (CLICK ON IMAGE FOR FACULTY PROFILE):

Sara Horowitz

CLASS TIME AND LOCATION: Mon & Wed 11:30 am–1 pm, HNE B11/DB 0013

COURSE WEBSITE:

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces reserved for Humanities, Jewish Studies & Religious Studies Majors and Minors.

HUMA 3858 3.0 CULT AND CULTURE IN ANCIENT CANAAN

This course surveys the material culture of the land known variously as Canaan, Israel, Judah, Judea, Palestine, and the Holy Land, from the Neolithic or "New Stone" Age (as of ca. 8500 BCE) until the Persian Period (539-330 BCE).

COURSE CATEGORY: Religious Thoughts and Practices

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Judaism

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2019/2020

HUMA 3875 6.0 METAPHOR, MYSTICISM AND SPIRITUALITY: PLATO TO BELLARMINE

This course reads texts from the Classical to the Early Modern Periods that present the quest for union with the divine in the framework of the theory of metaphor in Lakoff and Johnson's Metaphors We Live By.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religion, Literature, and the Arts; Religious Thoughts and Practices; Methods and Approaches

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Christianity

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: AP/HUMA 4751 3.00.

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2019/2020

HUMA 3975 3.0 (WINTER) SCIENCE AND RELIGION IN MODERN WESTERN CULTURE

Examination of the relationship between science and religion through a study of the implications of the following intellectual developments for religious thought: the rise and triumph of Newtonian science, the Darwinian revolution, relativity theory, quantum physics, “big bang” theory, and creationism.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religious Thoughts and Practices; Methods and Approaches

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Christianity

COURSE DIRECTOR (CLICK ON IMAGE FOR FACULTY PROFILE):

Bernie Lightman

CLASS TIME AND LOCATION: Wed 11:30 am–2:30 pm, HNE 105

COURSE WEBSITE:

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces reserved for Humanities Majors and Minors.