2000 Level Courses

NOTE: As a result of the Covid-19 crisis, the Religious Studies Program will not be offering any in-person classes for the Fall term. All courses, unless otherwise stated, will be offered synchronously (i.e., students will be expected to be available during the currently allotted course time); certain accommodations may be possible under specific circumstances (more exact details will be made available at the beginning of each course by your course instructor). For example, courses may be offered with both, synchronous and asynchronous (on your own time) components. Courses listed as "Online" will be offered asynchronously. This means that these courses do not have any real-time (i.e., synchronous) component.

PHIL 2035 3.0 ASIAN PHILOSOPHICAL TRADITIONS

An introduction to the major philosophical traditions of India and China.

Course credit exclusion: AS/PHIL 2035 3.00 (prior to Fall 2009)

COURSE CATEGORY: Religious Thoughts and Practices

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED:  Buddhism, East Asian Religions, Hinduism.

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2020/2021

PHIL 2040 3.0 INTRODUCTION TO ISLAMIC PHILOSOPHY

An introduction to some of the key figures, seminal texts, and main themes of Islamic philosophy in the classical period. Authors may include: al-Farabi, Ibn Sina (Avicenna), al-Ghazali, and Ibn Rushd (Averroes).

COURSE CATEGORY: Religious Thoughts and Practices

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Islam

Course credit exclusion: AS/PHIL 2550 3.00 (prior to Fall 2009)

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2020/2021

PHIL 2090 3.0 INTRODUCTION TO THE PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION

Does God exist? Can religious belief be explained away? What is the relationship between faith and reason? Through a selection of classic readings, this course provides a survey of some central topics in the philosophy of religion.

Course credit exclusions: AK/AS/PHIL 2090 3.00 (prior to Fall 2009).

COURSE CATEGORY: Religious Thoughts and Practices

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Multiple

COURSE DIRECTORS: TBA

CLASS TIME: Wednesday 2:30–5:30 pm

ANTH 2200 6.0 ANTHROPOLOGY OF RELIGION AND SCIENCE

This course considers religion and science from a cross-cultural anthropological perspective to explore and understand how different social groups in different cultural and historical contexts come to know and understand the world around them. This course will examine a wide range of classical and contemporary anthropological, cross-cultural approaches to some large questions that human societies might ask themselves, and to the nature of their lives, worlds, and experiences. The course will explore ideas such as: What is understood by nature? How is it differentiated from culture? What are the implications of such a division? And how can anthropology contribute in rethinking the nature-culture divide? For example, the course may look at how the world is seen through a scientific lens and how certain ways of knowing become established as dominant truths. The course will offer a solid foundation in the anthropology of knowledge and prepare students for upper level courses.

Course Credit Exclusion AP/ANTH 2200 3.0

COURSE CATEGORY: Religious Thoughts and Practices

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Multiple

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2020/2021

GLSOCI 2672/GLHUMA 2672 3.0 RELIGION AND SOCIETY

This course analyzes the relationship between religion, culture and social class. It observes how religion, as a social structure, organizes communities around beliefs and rituals. It introduces students to classical sociological theories about religion; looking at empirical cases globally. This course is an organic examination of how social phenomena called "religions" shape and influence societies. It uses an experiential and participative pedagogy to allow you to learn deeply about how beliefs get reified into institutions, discourses and practices that dictate and prescribe how believers conduct their lives (sexuality, dress code, food restrictions, body modifications, family patterns, money in relation to ascetism, consumerism and greed, violence against women, and fundamental ism against democracy). It will refine your critical thinking, self-reflection, and sense of observation. It will be a provocative approach that will challenge but also strengthen your own beliefs.

Course credit exclusion: GL/SOCI 2525 300 (prior to Fall 2014)

This course is open to students in their first, second or third year of study

COURSE CATEGORY: Self, Society and Other

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Multiple

COURSE DIRECTORS: TBA

CLASS TIME: Friday 12:00–2:00 pm (plus tutorial)

HIST 2790 6.0 ISLAMIC CIVILIZATION (622–1400)

This course explores the development and nature of Islamic civilization from the seventh century to 1400 AD.

COURSE CATEGORY: Religious Thoughts and Practices

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED: Islam

COURSE DIRECTORS: TBA

CLASS TIME: Tuesday 2:30–5:50 pm

HUMA 2805 6.0 WORLD RELIGIONS IN CANADA

Tracing the origins and development of different religious communities, this course identifies and analyzes ways in which the religious reflects, shapes and embodies the social and cultural diversity and plurality of everyday life in Canada. It invites students to explore a variety of religious experiences and traditions, as they are domesticated in local and familiar contexts upon Canada's social and cultural landscape. The course examines the sacred texts, myths, doctrines, ethics, rituals, institutions and attitudes to contemporary issues of First Nations peoples, Jews, Christians, Muslims, Ba’hais, Hindus, Buddhists, Sikhs and East Asians in their personal spiritual and communal religious lives. The course compares and contrasts classical and Canadian forms of the religious traditions studied, both in terms of their historical dispersion and in terms of their dealings one with another in today's Canada in both urban and rural environments. New Religious Movements and less well-known expressions of the spiritual and the religious also receive attention. Students are encouraged to investigate the contemporary status and future development of the spiritual and the religious in Canada, especially instances of their individual and institutional manifestation in material culture and the popular media.

COURSE CATEGORY: Self, Society, and the Other

RELIGIOUS TRADITION(S) COVERED:  Buddhism, East Asian Religions, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Sikhism

THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED IN 2020/2021

RESERVED SPACES: Some spaces reserved for Humanities and Religious Studies Majors and Minors.